• 1.301 Moved Permanently

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  • 2.Anxieties of Democracy Program Assistant | Employment | About

    Anxieties of Democracy Program Assistant Summary The SSRC seeks a Program Assistant to work with the growing Anxieties of Democracy program. With excellent organizational and administrative skills, the Program Assistant will support scholarship oriented toward impact in a program motivated by a deep concern about whether the core institutions of representative democracies can capably address large problems in the public interest. Description The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent, international, nonprofit organization devoted to the advancement of interdisciplinary research in the social sciences through a wide variety of workshops and conferences, fellowships and grants, summer training institutes, scholarly exchanges, research, and publications. For more information, please visit our website: http://www.ssrc.org. The SSRC seeks a Program Assistant to work with the Anxieties of Democracy program. The program is motivated by a deep concern about whether the core institutions of representative democracies—elections, mass media, political parties, interest groups, social movements, and, especially, legislatures—that connect citizens and civil society to the political system can capably address large problems in the public interest. The program includes both a particular focus on US democracy and a global perspective on established democracies across the world. The Anxieties of Democracy program aims to mobilize existing research; promote new research; publish and disseminate findings; forge pathways for bringing this knowledge to policy, media, and public audiences; and provide opportunities for new generations of social scientists to address how to make democracies govern more effectively. The program currently mobilizes a set of working groups, manages a small grants program, and organizes outreach efforts. Qualifications BA in a social science field required. Interest and academic experience in the study of democratic systems (particularly in the United States) preferred. One to two years of administrative, research, or related work experience in a nonprofit or academic environment preferred. Excellent interpersonal, written, and oral communication skills and a high degree of professionalism are essential. Excellent organizational skills, with strong attention to detail and ability to multitask. Experience and/or familiarity with social media, web, and database development preferred. Demonstrated ability to take initiative, assume responsibility, work independently, and respond flexibly to changing demands. Proficiency in MS Office (including Word, Excel, and Outlook), database management, and Internet applications. Responsibilities Support Program Director, and collaborate with other SSRC staff, with overall administration of the program. Organize on- and off-site workshops and meetings. This includes handling logistics, preparing meeting agendas and other relevant meeting materials, and coordinating and facilitating correspondence with participants and all relevant constituents during workshops and meetings. Process payment requests for meeting participants, vendors, and program partners. Work with budgets and financial reports, and process and reconcile expenses against budgets. Take minutes of complex discussions, and draft event summary notes. Assist with the production of advertising and outreach materials. Help expand the program’s online presence, which includes managing and updating program web pages and social media applications. Assist with drafting program reports and proposals. Serve as primary contact for program-related questions and correspondence. Support a small grants program on Negotiating Agreement in Congress. Create and maintain program data, including files for applicants, fellows, and contacts. Serve as primary contact for advisory committee and working group members, and NAC grantees, including regular correspondence and document collection. Other duties and additional responsibilities and projects as directed, depending upon interest and capacity. Terms, Salary and…

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  • 3.Anxieties of Democracy Program Director | Employment | About

    Anxieties of Democracy Program Director Summary The SSRC seeks a Program Director the Anxieties of Democracy program. The Program Director will oversee focused working groups, a grants program, and a range of outreach and public engagement activities dedicated to addressing how to make democracies govern more effectively. Description The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent, international, nonprofit organization devoted to the advancement of interdisciplinary research in the social sciences through a wide variety of workshops and conferences, fellowships and grants, summer training institutes, scholarly exchanges, research, and publications. The SSRC invites applications for the position of Program Director for the Anxieties of Democracy program. The program is motivated by a deep concern about whether the core institutions of representative democracies—elections, mass media, political parties, interest groups, social movements, and, especially, legislatures—that connect citizens and civil society to the political system can capably address large problems in the public interest. The program includes both a particular focus on US democracy and a global perspective on established democracies across world regions. With the support of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and others, the Anxieties of Democracy program aims to mobilize existing research; promote new research; publish and disseminate findings; forge pathways for bringing this knowledge to policy, media, and public audiences; and provide opportunities for new generations of social scientists to address how to make democracies govern more effectively. It pursues these goals through a set of topically focused working groups, a grants program, and a range of outreach and public engagement activities. This position is for three years and is potentially renewable. Qualifications The best-qualified candidates will have a PhD in one of the social sciences or a closely related field and demonstrated achievements as a researcher. Recent PhDs may apply, but competitive candidates should demonstrate experience in program or project administration, collaborative work, the organization of events, connection and outreach to practitioners, and supervision of staff. Ability to communicate effectively is crucial, and experience engaging both researchers and nonacademic constituencies, including funders and policymakers, is critical. Familiarity with grants administration and budgeting is desirable. Candidates must demonstrate their ability to work collaboratively and to manage multiple priorities and projects effectively. Responsibilities The Program Director will manage the continued development and implementation of the Anxieties of Democracy program, including the development of funding proposals to support program activities; with the program’s Advisory Committee and the SSRC president, establish substantive program directions, facilitate strategic planning, and conduct oversight of program activities; engage with program funders and produce reports on program progress; oversee planning for upcoming events, including conferences, workshops, and other meetings, as well as manage program budgets; oversee the process and quality of publications emerging from the program as well as its online and social media presence; facilitate connections between scholars and relevant policy and media communities in order to maximize the possibilities of shaping broader public debate on how to improve the problem-solving capacities of representative democratic institutions; oversee a small-scale grants program on Negotiating Agreement in Congress; liaise and coordinate with SSRC colleagues and various organizational partners on aspects of program implementation; and handle additional responsibilities and projects as directed, depending on interest and capacity. Terms, Salary and Benefits Annual salary will be commensurate with experience. Comprehensive benefits include health, dental, vision, disability, life, and gym…

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  • 4.Board of Directors | About

    Board of Directors The SSRC is governed by a board of directors made up of social scientists and practitioners from a broad range of disciplines and institutions. The board elects the SSRC president and regularly reviews the Council’s intellectual program. An executive committee of the board oversees financial and operational aspects. List of Board Members Julia Adams Professor of Sociology and International & Area StudiesYale University danah boyd Founder and PresidentData & Society John Seely Brown Visiting Scholar Advisor to the ProvostUniversity of Southern California Independent CochairmanDeloitte’s Center for the Edge Teresa P. R. Caldeira Professor of City and Regional Planning College of Environmental DesignUniversity of California, Berkeley Sandra Dawson (Chair, Executive Committee) KPMG Professor Emeritus of Management StudiesUniversity of Cambridge Isabelle de Lamberterie Director of Research EmeritaCentre National de la Recherche Scientifique Mamadou Diouf (Chair, Board of Directors) Leitner Family Professor of African Studies Director of the Institute of African StudiesColumbia University Michael Gellert General Partner and CofounderWindcrest Partners Edward Glaeser Professor of EconomicsHarvard University William H. Janeway Senior Advisor Managing DirectorWarburg Pincus Ira Katznelson (Ex Officio) PresidentSSRC Naomi R. Lamoreaux Stanley B. Resor Professor of Economics and History Chair, Department of HistoryYale University Research AssociateNational Bureau of Economic Research Peter Lange Thomas A. Langford University Professor Professor of Political Science and Public PolicyDuke University Margaret Levi Director, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences Professor of Political ScienceStanford University Jere L. Bacharach Professor Emerita of International StudiesUniversity of Washington Helen V. Milner Director, Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance B. C. Forbes Professor of Politics and International AffairsPrinceton University Peter Nager Senior Managing DirectorEgret Capital Partners Walter W. Powell Professor of Education and (by courtesy) Sociology, Organizational Behavior, Management Science and Engineering, Communication, and Public Policy Codirector, Center on Philanthropy and Civil SocietyStanford University José A. Scheinkman Edwin W. Rickert Professor of EconomicsColumbia University Barbara Stallings Professor of International Studies [Research] Watson InstituteBrown University Julia Adams Julia Adams is professor of sociology and international and area studies and master of Calhoun College at Yale University. She teaches and conducts research in the areas of state development, social theory and public knowledge, gender/family, early modern European politics, and colonialism and empire. Her monograph The Familial State: Ruling Families and Merchant Capitalism in Early Modern Europe (Cornell, 2005) won the Gaddis Smith International Book Prize. She coedited Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire (Emerald, 2015); “Patrimonial Power in the Modern World,” a 2011 special issue of the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science; and Remaking Modernity: Politics, History, and Sociology (Duke, 2005). Her work has twice won the Barrington Moore Jr. Award for best article, given by the American Sociological Association (ASA) section in Comparative and Historical Sociology. In 2013, Adams was awarded a National Science Foundation grant for collaborative research on Wikipedia and the democratization of academic knowledge. Adams graduated from Reed College and did her graduate work at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She served as 2008–2009 president of the Social Science History Association and 2012–2013 chair of the ASA Global and Transnational section. At Yale, she has chaired the department of sociology and the International Affairs Council and directed the Division of the Social Sciences. She has also served as deputy provost for social sciences and faculty development and diversity. Adams currently codirects Yale’s Center for Historical Enquiry a…

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  • 5.Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum Program Assistant | Employment | About

    Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum Program Assistant Summary The SSRC seeks a Program Assistant to work with the Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum. Description The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent, international, nonprofit organization devoted to the advancement of interdisciplinary research in the social sciences through a wide variety of workshops and conferences, fellowships and grants, summer training institutes, scholarly exchanges, research, and publications. The SSRC seeks a Program Assistant to work with the Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum (CPPF). CPPF works to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations system for peacebuilding and the prevention, management, and resolution of conflict by providing UN decision makers with access to expert analysis from international academics, practitioners, and others outside the UN system. Qualifications Bachelor of arts or bachelor of sciences degree required. Team player with demonstrated ability to take initiative, work independently, and respond flexibly to changing demands. Excellent writing skills. Excellent interpersonal and organizational skills. Attention to detail and high degree of professionalism. Strong computer skills (Word, Excel, Access, QuickBooks, Internet search). Previous experience with budget and office management preferred. Interest in international relations and politics desirable. Foreign language skills desirable (Spanish and French preferred). Responsibilities Support program staff with overall administration of the program. Organize on- and off-site workshops and meetings. This includes handling logistics including booking domestic and international travel, preparing meeting agendas and other relevant meeting materials, and coordinating and facilitating correspondence with participants and all relevant constituents during workshops and meetings. Manage the program’s online presence, which includes managing and updating program web pages and social media applications. Take minutes of complex discussions, and draft event summary notes. Process expenditures, including payments for consultants, advisors, and other expenses. Work with budgets and financial reports, and process and reconcile expenses against budgets. Prepare staff meeting documents on a weekly basis. Prepare and draft grant proposals as well as grant narrative reports and financial reports. Distribute quarterly reports and program outputs to donors. Serve as primary contact for program-related questions and correspondence. Maintain and update program data, including donor contact list and donor share site. Other duties and additional responsibilities and projects as directed, depending upon interest and capacity. Terms, Salary and Benefits Annual salary is $33,000. Comprehensive benefits include health, dental, vision, disability, life, and gym reimbursement; $1,500 annual tuition and/or student loan reimbursement; outstanding pension plan and tax savings programs; generous vacation and sick leave; and more. Application Information To apply, please send cover letter, resume, and a brief work- or research-related writing sample to applications@ssrc.org in PDF format. Please include “CPPF PA Search” in the subject line. The Social Science Research Council is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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  • 6.Contact Us | About

    Contact Us Online Form - SSRC Contact Form.

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  • 7.Council News

    Subscribe to our Council Update E-Newsletter Name Email Subscribe Council Update Archive 2017 March Measure of America releases the latest report in its Youth Disconnection series, the DSD program cohost a panel on “Alternatives to Incarceration,” and CPPF publishes a new set of SSRC Working Papers. February The DPD Program announces its University Initiative partners, the SSRC names its next president, and the InterAsia Program launched a new website for its Transregional Virtual Research Institute. January Measure of America launches the Common Good Forecaster, APN holds a workshop for its 2016 cohort, and the IIAS-SSRC Winter School on Media Activism and Postcolonial Futures takes place at the Chinese University of Hong Kong 2016 December The SSRC publishes the seventh volume of the Advancing Transitional Justice Series, the APN co-organizes a policy roundtable, and Amartya Sen wins the 2016 Hirschman Prize. November The Abe Fellowship Program celebrates its 25th anniversary, Items launches a new series on “Reading Racial Conflict,” and Measure of America updates DATA2GO.NYC with the latest available data. 2015 November CPPF deputy director Tatiana Carayannis and IDRF fellow Louisa Lombard (2009) coedit Making Sense of the Central African Republic, the Anxieties of Democracy program hosts a lecture and dialogue on “Equality in a New Age of Inequalities,” and Measure of America announces the DATA2GO.NYC Visualization Challenge. OctoberThe SAGE Handbook of Research Management released; the inaugural Social Science After Hours to open with a presentation of DATA2GO.NYC by Measure of America; and the Carnegie Corporation profiles the Arab Council for the Social Sciences, headed by program director Seteney Shami. September Measure of America to launch DATA2GO.NYC; SSRC fellows publish books on Drugs, Thugs, and Diplomats: U.S. Policymaking in Colombia, and more; and The Immanent Frame looks at Cosmology and the Environment. July New reports reveal realities of race in America; The Decent City initiative cohosts an international debate in Barcelona, Spain; and the African Peacebuilding Network releases a policy brief on Nigeria’s 2015 elections. May IDRF Photo Competition winners; board member Margaret Levi elected to the National Academy of Sciences; and SSRC fellows publish books, from Remixing Reggaetón to The Killing Consensus, based on their fellowship research. AprilImplications of Normalization: Scholarly Perspectives on U.S.-Cuban Relations launches, The Immanent Frame looks at the intellectual genealogy of ISIS, and the Council remembers Visiting Committee member Norman H. Nie. March Hirschman Prize awarded to Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo, and the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab; University Fund for the Social Sciences announced; and fellows published in the Hispanic American Historical Review, South Asian Studies, and more. February “Why Prayer? A Conference on New Directions in the Study of Prayer” held at Columbia University; Harvard professor John Comaroff on the sociology of criminology both in Cape Town and Ferguson, Missouri; and scholars respond to the Charlie Hebdo attack at The Immanent Frame. January The SSRC’s 90th Anniversary Celebration; a new Drugs, Security and Democracy working paper on research security; and community policing by African chiefs through social media. 2014 December Measure of America releases A Portrait of California 2014–2015, Northeast Asia Cooperative Security Project director Leon Sigal discusses denuclearization through gradual reconciliation, and “The Social Cost of Shrimp in Bangladesh.” OctoberDiaspora Lobbies and the US Government, new SSRC Research Snapshot on grasses and empire, and the InterAsia Program’s “Media as Activism” conference in New Delhi. September The Education Research Program releases Aspiring Adults Adrift, Tanur Prize winners announced, and “Why Do Americans Stink at Math?” July The Decent City initiative releases The Cities Papers, new Measure of America report on opportunity, and a The Immanent Frame piece on…

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  • 8.Creative Commons

    Creative Commons Except where otherwise noted, content published on or after January 1, 2014, on the SSRC’s public website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. This license permits you to copy, distribute, and display such content as long as you mention and link back to the SSRC, attribute the work appropriately (including both author and title), and do not adapt the content or use it commercially. For all undated content and all content published on the SSRC’s website prior to January 1, 2014, please contact the Council’s Communications Department to ensure that there are no legal restrictions on the use of the material in question. The information presented and opinions expressed in individual posts and comments on the SSRC’s website do not necessarily represent the views of the Social Science Research Council.

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  • 9.Directions to the SSRC

    Directions to the SSRC View Larger Map The Social Science Research Council is located at One Pierrepont Plaza in Brooklyn, on the 15th floor. Our street address, according to Google Maps, is 300 Cadman Plaza West, just north of Pierrepont Street. We are near several subway stops. Detailed directions are available for trains arriving from Manhattan: 2, 3: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 2, 3) 4, 5: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 4, 5) A, C: High St/Brooklyn Bridge (detailed directions from the A, C) F: Jay St/Borough Hall (detailed directions from the F) R: Court St (detailed directions from the R) Upon entering the building, please show your ID to the front desk attendant, who will grant you access to the elevators. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. If you need any assistance, please do not hesitate to contact the front desk at 212-377-2700. Thank you! Our mailing address is: Social Science Research Council One Pierrepont Plaza, 15th Floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA P: 212-377-2700 | F: 212-377-2727 | E: info@ssrc.org Detailed Directions from Manhattan 2, 3 to Borough Hall: Use the stairs or escalator toward the rear of the train for the “Court Street and Montague Street” exit. Proceed through the turnstile then exit the station using the staircase on your right to Montague Street. Cross Montague Street toward TD Bank. Look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. To get there, keep walking North (straight) along Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Our main entrance has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. 4, 5 to Borough Hall: Use the staircase toward the middle of the platfrom for the “Borough Hall/Joralemon Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, follow signs toward Borough Hall. Proceed through turnstile then take the stairs furthest to your left. You will exit in front of Duane Reade. Walk north on Court Street (away from starbucks) past Remsen and Montague Streets. At Montague Street, Court Street becomes Cadman Plaza West. Continue north on Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Ours is the first building after Pierrepont Street, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. A, C to High St/Brooklyn Bridge: Use the stairs near the rear of the train for the “Cadman Plaza West, Cranberry Street, Henry Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, proceed to the bank of escalators and up. There is only one exit—when you emerge onto the sidewalk, you’ll be facing south on Cadman Plaza West. Continue straight ahead on Cadman, crossing Clark and Clinton streets. If you look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. F to Jay St/Borough Hall: Use the stairs toward the front of the train for the “Willoughby Street and Jay Street” exit. Walk north on Jay Street (past Metrotech Walk and Mrtyle Avenue) to Johnson Street, which will be the first possible left. Turn left onto Johnson and continue west toward Cadman Plaza West. If you look up, you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the buildin…

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  • 10.Employment | About

    The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) employs a diverse workforce in the United States at our headquarters in Brooklyn, New York, as well as internationally. Benefits include health, dental, vision, disability, life, and gym reimbursement; pension plan and tax savings programs; and generous vacation and sick leave. Student loan and tuition reimbursement are available for all full-time staff, and provisions are made for professional staff to continue their development as professional social scientists. In addition, the Council offers a wide range of internship opportunities to current, recent, or returning students. Most internships are unpaid or carry small stipends. We encourage you to apply for the specific openings that have been listed and summarized below. Be sure to follow the link to more detailed information on necessary qualifications, employment terms, and application procedures. Current Openings Anxieties of Democracy Program Assistant The SSRC seeks a Program Assistant to work with the growing Anxieties of Democracy program. With excellent organizational and administrative skills, the Program Assistant will support scholarship oriented toward impact in a program motivated by a deep concern about whether the core institutions of representative democracies can capably address large problems in the public interest. Anxieties of Democracy Program Director The SSRC seeks a Program Director the Anxieties of Democracy program. The Program Director will oversee focused working groups, a grants program, and a range of outreach and public engagement activities dedicated to addressing how to make democracies govern more effectively. Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum Program Assistant The SSRC seeks a Program Assistant to work with the Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum. Program Assistant/Associate, Abe Fellowship Program Tokyo Office The Social Science Research Council seeks a Program Assistant/Associate for its Abe Fellowship Program in its office in Tokyo, Japan. Working with the Program Manager and program staff, the assistant will be responsible for supporting the day-to-day operation of the office. Program Manager The SSRC seeks a Program Manager for its Drugs, Security and Democracy Program at its office in Brooklyn, NY. Vietnam and Southeast Asia Program Assistant The SSRC invites applications for the position of Vietnam and Southeast Asia Program Assistant. This position will help support the program through administrative duties and by assisting with program-related research, evaluation, data analysis, social media/web analytics, grant reporting, website updates and maintenance, and program finance and expenses.

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  • 11.Executive Officers | About

    Executive Officers Working social scientists, the SSRC’s executive officers inspire and manage programming and operations with the counsel and oversight of the Board of Directors. Current Executive Officers IRA KATZNELSON President MARY BYRNE MCDONNELLExecutive Director RONALD KASSIMIR Executive Program Director A History of Leadership 1923–27 Charles E. Merriam (chairman) 1927–29 Wesley C. Mitchell (chairman) 1927–31 Robert S. Lynd (permanent secretary) 1929–31 Edwin B. Wilson (president) 1931–32 Robert S. Woodworth (president) 1931–45 Robert T. Crane (permanent secretary, 1931–32; executive director, 1932–45) 1945–48 Donald Young (executive director, 1945–47; president, 1948) 1948–68 Pendleton Herring (president) 1948–70 Paul Webbink (vice president) 1966–71 Henry W. Riecken (vice president, 1966–68; president, 1969–71) 1971–72 Ralph W. Tyler (acting president) 1972–79 Eleanor Bernert Sheldon (president) 1973–89 David L. Sills (executive associate) 1974–78 David Jenness (executive associate) 1979–85 Kenneth Prewitt (president) 1985–86 Francis X. Sutton (interim president) 1986–89 Frederic E. Wakeman Jr. (president) 1988–89 David L. Szanton (executive associate) 1988–89 Richard C. Rockwell (executive associate) 1989–95 David L. Featherman (president) 1990–95 Stanley J. Heginbotham (vice president) 1995–98 Kenneth Prewitt (president) 1997–present Mary Byrne McDonnell (executive program director, 1997–99; executive director, 1999–present) 1998–99 Orville (Bert) Brim Jr. (interim president) 1999–2012 Craig Calhoun (president) 2012–present Ira Katznelson (president) 2015–present Ronald Kassimir (executive program director).

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  • 12.Fellowships

    Promoting innovative research worldwide Since 1923, the SSRC has awarded more than fifteen thousand fellowships to researchers around the globe. Council fellowship programs are strategic—they target specific problems, promote individual and institutional change, and expand networks. The SSRC’s varied fellowships and prizes share a core commitment to improving conditions for social science knowledge production worldwide. Programs engage themes ranging from global issues facing the United States and Japan to security in Africa and Latin America.

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  • 13.Financials | About

    Financials 2016 Audited Financial Statements2015 Audited Financial Statements.

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  • 14.Get Involved

    SUPPORT THE SSRC Council programs support researchers, build worldwide capacity for knowledge production, and nurture innovation and excellence. For more than ninety years, these activities have been made possible by the generosity of our foundation, institutional, governmental, and individual partners. The need for rich and effective social science is urgent and persistent. As a proven incubator for new forms of inquiry, and as a connector and communicator of research and expertise, the SSRC plays a vital role in the work of building a more just society. Our donors are key partners in that work.

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  • 15.Historical Timeline | About

    Historical Timeline The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) has been in operation for more than ninety years. We present this timeline of organizational achievements and other highlights during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. For more detailed accounts of the SSRC’s history, see our one-page history of the SSRC and Social Science Research Council, 1923–1998. The SSRC’s records are stored in the Rockefeller Archive Center, Sleepy Hollow, New York. SSRC: 90 Years of Impact Early History 1923: Led by American Political Science Association president Charles E. Merriam, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) holds its inaugural meeting. 1924: The SSRC begins planning its first committees to study such topics as Interracial Relations, Scientific Aspects of Human Migration, and the Eighteenth Amendment. 1928: The Advisory Committee on Business Research, whose members include New York State Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt, is founded, signaling the Council’s commitment to research on business practices, ethics, and industry relations. 1935: The SSRC establishes the Washington, DC–based Committee on Social Security. Its research is critical to the creation of the U.S. Social Security system. 1936: Ralph Bunche, Margaret Mead, and Grayson Kirk are among a cohort of scholars receiving fellowship support from the SSRC. 1937: The SSRC commissions 13 research memoranda to record and analyze the influence of the Great Depression on American society. Topics include crime, education, the family, internal migration, minorities, religion, consumption, health, and social work. 1942: With the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the National Research Council, the SSRC establishes the Committee on Latin American Studies. One of several new committees founded with the ACLS, it marks the beginning of the Council’s work focused on developing US expertise on world regions. 1945: George Gallup, Elmo Roper, and Frank Stanton are founding members of the Committee on Measurement of Opinion, Attitudes, and Consumer Wants, which examines problems of sampling, of biases introduced by interviewers, and of the use of panels of responses in repetitive surveys. Post–World War II 1947: Robert B. Hall publishes his influential Area Studies: With Special Reference to Their Implications for Research in the Social Sciences, sponsored by the SSRC’s Exploratory Committee on World Area Research. It warns of scholarly ignorance about many areas of the world and recommends a sweeping educational initiative. Within two years, committees on Slavic and East European Studies and Southern Asia are established. 1947: The SSRC publishes The Reduction of Intergroup Tensions: A Survey of Research on Problems of Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Group Relations. 1949: Future Nobel Prize winner Simon Kuznets chairs the SSRC’s Committee on Economic Growth, which for two decades shaped basic theory and quantitative research methods in economics. Over the next few decades, future Nobel laureates in economics would participate in the Council’s work in this area: Herbert Simon, Lawrence Klein, James Tobin, George Stigler, Franco Modigliani, and George Akerlof. Much more recently, Paul Krugman was involved in developing our work on the privatization of risk. 1954: The SSRC establishes the Committee on Comparative Politics, chaired by Gabriel Almond. It sponsors pioneering work in the area of modernization and development in the wake of decolonization. 1956: The SSRC creates the Committee on National Security Policy Research; members include Henry Kissinger. Subsequent Council programs covering international affairs topics attract the participation of other prominent foreign policy figures and commentators including John Lewis Gaddis, Zbigniew Brzezinski, McGeorge Bundy, Robert Keohane, William Pfaff, Condoleezza Rice, and George Shultz. 1959: The SSRC, with the ACLS, forms committees on Contemporary China, the Near and Middle East, and African Studies. 1961: Responding to breakthroughs in scientific research, the SSRC founds a committee on…

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  • 16.How We Work | About

    How We Work SSRC staff and scholars work to gather knowledge and communicate its implications for debate and public use. As we partner with institutions and scholars around the world, the Council offers an independent space for collaboration and an unbiased voice for social science. Through research networks and committees, workshops and conferences, summer training institutes and fellowships, scholarly exchanges and publications, the Council enhances the conditions for knowledge production worldwide. The SSRC’s organizational capacities focus on four intersecting purposes: Supporting Innovation in Social Science Scholarship By connecting disciplines and methods, the SSRC advances fresh ways to inquire, expand, and integrate the craft of social science. Building Interdisciplinary and International Networks to Address Public Issues The Council’s experience and standing allow it to convene leading researchers and practitioners—from policymakers and UN leaders, to architects and artists, to journalists and activists—to generate new knowledge and explore solutions to pressing public matters. Nurturing Scholars and Strengthening Institutions Through fellowships, workshops, and mentorship, the SSRC identifies and supports the most promising young professionals across the social sciences. While supporting individual scholars, the SSRC is also deeply committed to improving worldwide conditions for knowledge production at an institutional level through capacity building, resource sharing, and networking. Communicating and Explaining Social Knowledge Relying upon diverse forms ranging from books and digital forums to conferences and public events, the Council seeks to deepen the comprehension of social science by journalists, policymakers, practitioners, and citizens. Through strengthening institutions and exploring digital frontiers, we also work to expand scholarly access to knowledge, particularly in arenas where access has traditionally been limited. Tools Graduate and postgraduate fellowships Convening policymakers and scholars Cross-disciplinary engagement and innovation Conferences and workshops Mentorship for young scholars Books and other publications Digital forums and resources Lectures and public events.

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  • 17.Mission | About

    Mission The Social Science Research Council is an independent, international, nonprofit organization founded in 1923. Governed by a board of directors, it fosters innovative research, nurtures new generations of social scientists, deepens how inquiry is practiced within and across disciplines, and mobilizes necessary knowledge on important public issues.

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  • 18.Print & Digital

    Sharing New Knowledge The SSRC has published in the social sciences since 1929 and continues to shape the direction of scholarship and public policy through a wide range of books, reports, working papers, policy briefs, and articles. SSRC digital projects extend our tradition of engagement through rigorous inquiry, offering informed perspectives on topics of pressing concern and essential resources for researchers and practitioners. Digital projects include forums, essay collections, resource hubs, and exhibitions of our programmatic work.

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  • 19.Privacy Policy

    Privacy Policy Identities of users of this Site are not anonymous, but names of users and personal identifying information about users will not be provided to any third parties. The Social Science Research Council does use IP addresses, domain information and other access statistics to analyze trends, administer the Site, track users’ movements, and gather broad demographic information for aggregate use. This information is not linked to personally identifiable information. The SSRC may share aggregated demographic information with third parties. Aggregate information is not linked to any personal information that can identify any individual person. This Privacy Policy applies to your use of sites under the domain www.ssrc.org and any other sub-domains of ssrc.org: fellowships.ssrc.org; programs.ssrc.org; etc. This Privacy Policy does not apply to your use of any affiliated or unaffiliated third-party sites to which the SSRC site may link. Subscription lists The SSRC web site provides subscription services, including e-mail based mailing lists. E-mail addresses collected in the maintenance of those lists are not shared with any person or organization outside of the SSRC. Subscription to any one mailing list is limited to that list only, unless the subscriber specifically requests additional subscriptions or correspondences. Exceptions In certain circumstances, and as exceptions to this Privacy Policy, we will, without notice to you, release specific information about you or your account to comply with any valid legal process such as a search warrant, subpoena, statute or court order, or in other special cases, such as, for example, an attempted breach of the security of the Site, or a physical threat to you or others. We may change this Privacy Policy from time to time to address new issues and reflect changes on this site, and as the need arises. All changes to this Privacy Policy will be posted here. Please refer to this Privacy Policy regularly. If you have any questions or concerns about this Privacy Policy, please send us an email at communications@ssrc.org.

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  • 20.Program Assistant/Associate, Abe Fellowship Program Tokyo Office | Employment | About

    Program Assistant/Associate, Abe Fellowship Program Tokyo Office Summary The Social Science Research Council seeks a Program Assistant/Associate for its Abe Fellowship Program in its office in Tokyo, Japan. Working with the Program Manager and program staff, the assistant will be responsible for supporting the day-to-day operation of the office. Description The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent, international, nonprofit organization devoted to the advancement of interdisciplinary research in the social sciences through a wide variety of workshops and conferences, fellowships and grants, summer training institutes, scholarly exchanges, research, and publications. The SSRC seeks a Program Assistant/Associate for its Tokyo office. This hire would be responsible for the day-to-day operation of the Abe Fellowship Program under the supervision of the Program Manager in the Tokyo Office. The Abe Fellowship Program encourages international multidisciplinary research on topics of pressing global concern. The program fosters the development of a new generation of researchers interested in policy-relevant topics and willing to become key members of a bilateral and global research network. In partnership with the SSRC, the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP) established the Abe Fellowship Program as its flagship program in 1991. Qualifications Bachelor of arts or science degree. Fluency in English and proficiency in Japanese (language and culture) required. Experience in an academic or nonprofit environment preferred. Excellent written and oral communication skills. Excellent organizational skills, with strong attention to detail. Self-motivation and ability to work independently as well as with a team within a professional office environment. Proficiency in Microsoft Office suite, database work, and Internet applications. Previous administrative experience a plus. Responsibilities Support Abe Fellowship Program Manager and program staff with administration of the program. Perform administrative tasks including, but not limited to, maintaining program files and documents, preparing meeting materials, and updating program websites and databases. Manage logistics for domestic and international program-related events. Arrange outreach activities, create program materials, and assist with marketing strategy. Liaise with the funder, program committee members, and fellows. Process expenditures and reimbursements for program accounting, and submit accounting reports. Correspond and cooperate with Abe Fellowship Program staff in the New York office. Other duties and additional responsibilities and projects as directed, depending upon interest and capacity. Terms, Salary and Benefits Salary will be commensurate with experience. Flexible schedules will be considered. Application Information For further information or to apply, please send cover letter, resume/CV, and a writing sample in PDF format to applications@ssrc.org. Please include “Abe Program Assistant Tokyo Office” in the subject field. The Social Science Research Council is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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  • 21.Program Manager | Employment | About

    Program Manager Summary The SSRC seeks a Program Manager for its Drugs, Security and Democracy Program at its office in Brooklyn, NY. Description The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent, international, nonprofit organization devoted to the advancement of interdisciplinary research in the social sciences through a wide variety of workshops and conferences, fellowships and grants, summer training institutes, scholarly exchanges, research, and publications. For more information, please visit our website: http://www.ssrc.org. Qualifications Master’s degree in Law, International Affairs, Public Policy, or Social Science; 2 years of experience in a position analyzing legislation and public or government policies; 2 years of experience managing complex projects; 1 year of experience working for a US-based Latin America-focused program or a Latin America-based non-governmental organization (NGO), government body, international organization, law firm, or policy-oriented research organization. Responsibilities The SSRC seeks a Program Manager for its Drugs, Security and Democracy Program to: Administer and manage the planning, operations, budget management, and expansion of the Drugs, Security and Democracy (DSD) Program, including writing reports and supervising support staff as necessary. Identify, develop, and coordinate projects with partner organizations and relevant contacts, including policy makers, government officials, NGOs, and research organizations, in Latin America and the Caribbean. Coordinate the network-building among program committee, fellows, researchers, policy makers and institutions in the United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Administer and manage the planning and operations of the Drugs, Security and Democracy (DSD) fellowship for policy-relevant research on issues related to drugs and drug policy in Latin America and the Caribbean, across a variety of social science disciplines. Advise and mentor DSD fellows on avenues of policy engagement that may lead to the development of alternatives to present-day drug policies. Organize and facilitate the annual workshop for fellows, the annual program committee meeting, and other program-related events. Provide strategic planning, evaluation and review of program protocols. Oversee the program’s online presence, including website, social media, and dissemination of fellows’ research. Other responsibilities and projects, as required for the development of the DSD Program. Application Information To apply, please send a cover letter and resume to applications@ssrc.org in PDF format. Please include “DSD Program Manager Search” in the subject line. The Social Science Research Council is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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  • 22.Programs

    AREAS OF RESEARCH AND COLLABORATION The Council’s programs nurture the excellent, the experimental, and the innovative. Our work is currently organized around the following general themes: Digital Knowledge, Media & Data Economic & Social Policy Global & Regional Connections Governance, Democracy & Civil Society Health & Environment Higher Education Peace, Conflict & Security.

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  • 23.SSRC Working Papers

    SSRC Working Papers Mobilizing necessary knowledge on underresearched but important public issues, SSRC Working Papers feature real-time social science commissioned by the Council’s programs. Previous papers have offered statistical analyses of national economic growth, considerations of the challenges of building international educational and intellectual capacity, and studies on global security and cooperation, addressing historically active areas of concern at the SSRC. Current working papers are listed below and are available for download free of charge, in keeping with the Council’s mission to enhance public access to information. APN Working Papers Filling gaps in African peacebuilding knowledge No. 1 The Financing of International Peace Operations in Africa: A Review of Recent Research and Analyses [PDF] By Corinna Jentzsch No. 2 Just Peace: Achieving Peace, Justice, and Development in Post-conflict Africa [PDF] By Dan Kuwali No. 3 Toward a Community of Practice: ECOWAS and Peace and Security Policy Communities in West Africa [PDF] By Olawale Ismail No. 4 The “Chief” and the New Baraza: Harnessing Social Media for Community Policing in Kenya [PDF] By Duncan Omanga No. 5 Beyond the Rebellion Alternative Narratives of Violent Conflicts and the Implications for Peacebuilding in the Niger Delta [PDF] By Tarila Marclint Ebiede No. 6 Blaise Compaoré in the Resolution of the Ivorian Conflict: From Belligerent to Mediator-in-Chief [PDF] By Amy Niang No. 7 The African Capacity for Immediate Response to Conflict and the African Standby Force: Options for Peace Intervention in Africa [PDF] By Jude Cocodia No. 8 Decolonizing the Mainstreaming of Gender in Peacebuilding: Toward an Agenda for Africa [PDF] By Heidi Hudson CPPF Working Papers on Models of Autonomous Rule No. 1 Self-Determination: Canada and Quebec [PDF] By David Cameron No. 2 The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico [PDF] By Efrén Rivera-Ramos No. 3 Case Studies in Forms of Self-Determination: A Comparison of the Åland Islands, South Tyrol, the Kurds in Iraq, and Catalonia [PDF] By Victor Ferreres Comella and Pau Bossacoma Busquets No. 4 Synthesizing Types of Self-Determination [PDF] By Jacob Mundy No. 5 Options for Territorial Self-Governance: Decentralization, Devolution, Autonomy, and Federation [PDF] By Stefan Wolff CPPF Working Papers on Women in Politics Tracking women’s political participation across the globe No. 1 Women’s Political Participation in Sub-Saharan Africa [PDF] By Aili Mari Tripp No. 2 Women in Politics and Policy in Latin America and the Caribbean [PDF] By Mala Htun and Jennifer Piscopo No. 3 Women’s Political Participation in Asia and the Pacific [PDF] By Jacqui True, Nicole George, Sara Niner, and Swati Parashar No. 4 Gender and Elections: Temporary Special Measures beyond Quotas [PDF] By Mona Lena Krook DSD Working Papers on Research Security Establishing safe practices for high-risk research No. 1 Qualitative Research in Dangerous Places: Becoming an Ethnographer of Violence and Personal Safety [PDF]By Daniel M. Goldstein No. 2 “How Was Your Trip?” Self-Care for Researchers Working and Writing on Violence [PDF]By Kimberly Theidon No. 3 Security Considerations for Conducting Fieldwork in Highly Dangerous Places or on Highly Dangerous Subjects [PDF]By Vanda Felbab-Brown No. 4 Building an Effective Research Safety Protocol and Emergency Exit Strategies [PDF]By Angélica Durán-Martínez No. 5 Doing Research in Violent Settings: Ethical Considerations and Ethics Committees [PDF]By Corinne Davis Rodrigues No. 6 Numbers under Fire: The Challenges of Gathering Quantitative Data in Highly Violent Settings [PDF]By Javier Osorio No. 7 Data Security in Highly Violent Settings [PDF]By Enrique Desmond Arias No. 8 The Familiar and the Foreign: Local and Visiting Researchers in Highly Violent Areas [PDF]By María Clemencia Ramírez Individual Working Papers The Measure of America Approach to Gauging Well-Being and Opportunity in the United States: Concept, Application, and Impacts at the Community Level [PDF]By Patrick Nolan Guyer Justice N…

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  • 24.Themes

    Interdisciplinary Topics and Fields of Work The Council’s roster of programs and activities is flexible and responsive to changes in the world around us. A research area that is critical today may have been emerging just a few years ago, and the scope of the SSRC’s work reflects the ever-changing nature of human life and society. Currently, our work is organized around these seven general themes.

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  • 25.University Fund | About

    University Fund A Partnership to Advance Social Science Scholarship To mark its ninetieth anniversary, the Social Science Research Council has established the University Fund for the Social Sciences, a consortium of higher education partners providing annual financial support to enhance the infrastructure of social science research, catalyze interdisciplinary and cross-institutional collaborations, and help launch the careers of junior scholars, who are offered fellowships, workshops, and various forms of mentorship. The following universities have joined the fund in recognition of the significant role that the Council plays in sustaining innovation in scholarship, building networks across the world to address public issues, and communicating social knowledge. Arizona State University Boston College Brown University City University of New York, the Graduate Center Columbia University Cornell University Dartmouth College Duke University Emory University Georgetown University Harvard University Indiana University Johns Hopkins University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Michigan State University New York University Northwestern University Princeton University Rutgers University (Camden, New Brunswick, Newark, and Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences) Stanford University University of California, Berkeley University of California, Davis University of California, San Diego University of California, Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Southern California Vanderbilt University Yale University “As we look toward the SSRC’s second century,” observes SSRC president Ira Katznelson, “the University Fund for the Social Sciences will increase the Council’s programmatic flexibility, expand our ability to galvanize scholars to work on significant policy questions, and extend the range and character of assistance we can offer to graduate students and faculty.” Printable Version Contact Info Kate Grantz, Executive Coordinator E-mail: grantz@ssrc.org Phone: 718-517-3613.

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